Information on the Coligny Calendar

Hi sisters... Nessa posted this link at Moonspells, which took me to a page
about the Celtic Druids. Lo and behold, a few paragraphs down, I found this
information about the Coligny Calendar. Annie, who used to be in the Grove
with us, had found this calendar and posted about it several moons ago. What
intrigues me is that the the text below says this calendar, a round moon
calendar looking startlingly like my moonwheels, calculated it's moon cycles in
a
pattern of 29 days each and 30 days each. It also had some years lasting
for 13 moons and some lasting for 12, to make sure their lunar time
calculations lined up with solar time. I had been told by Grey Cat (see
earlier
discourses) that there are two twelve moon years and one 13 moon year every
three
years. But this text seems to be saying that the Coligny calendar calculated
two 13 moon years succeeded by two 12 moon years, and then back to two 13 moon
years. !!! Perhaps this explains why I've had difficult verifying Grey
Cat's information. Or perhaps I am misunderstanding this text? It's not very
clear.
I just got my blank moonwheels copied out for starting to fill in my
calendar for '06. So far, from what I can tell, this year we are finishing up
now
is a 12 moon year. If Grey cat is right the next one should also be a 12
moon year. Once I scrutinize my Wemoon I should be able to figure it out.
Even
though Wemoon always has 13, even when there are only 12 - and the same goes
for the Lunar Calendar out of Boston... if there are two winter solstices
in the same calendar, that is a clue. I'll let you know what I come up with.

Meanwhile, if anyone needs help with dates for filling in your moonwheels
please don't hesitate to ask.
If you get any clearer info, do let me know too.
Blessings,
Shekhinah
Here's the link: I couldn't find an author name anywhere. I tried going to
just sunrisedancer.com and saw the name Sunrise Dancer... so perhaps this is
the author.
_http://sunrisedancer.com/radicalreader/library/celts/celts09.asp_
(http://sunrisedancer.com/radicalreader/library/celts/celts09.asp)
Excerpted from a webpage of text entitled: The Mastery of Death: Deities and
Druids
In 1897 at Coligny in Burgundy fragments of a bronze tablet of the last
century BC came to light. Put together they constituted what is still the
longest
known document in the Gallic language. It contains forty different words
written in Latin script—for philologists, a magnificent find—and was a
calendar. In deciphering it, it became clear that the Celts worked in units of
sixty‑
two lunar months, i.e. the period between each new moon and the next. One of
these months would contain thirty days, the next twenty‑nine, which gave
half‑
months of fifteen days, or one fifteen‑day one followed by a fourteen‑day
one. Each day was counted, as is today still the practice among the Jews and
Moslems, from moon‑rise to moon‑rise, with the result that it was not
always
exactly divided into twenty‑four hours. The year that emerged from all this
was eleven days shorter than the 365‑day period the earth takes to go round
the sun.
This created a problem common to all calendar‑makers who base their
calculations on the moon. If they ignored this annual time difference, sooner
or
later March would occur when the leaves were already turning brown and June
would
be in winter. To compensate, they would have to do some juggling. Stone Age
man set up the giant constructions of Stonehenge and Carnac so as to get at
the astronomical facts necessary for solar and lunar time to be synchronized.
For a short time in the fifth century BC the Greeks, who also calculated
according to the phases of the moon, established a complicated system of
dividing
up time. The geologist Meton of Athens had worked it out. It was based on a
nine‑year cycle of twelve ordinary and seven leap‑years: the average of 110
twenty‑nine‑day and 125 thirty‑day months resulted in a mean solar year.
The
Coligny calendar was rather simpler, but arrived at by a similarly ingenious
method. The twelve‑month periods were balanced out by two of thirteen months.
In the end the period of five solar orbits emerged, fairly exactly
calculated. The disadvantage that not every year within such a
sixty‑two‑month cycle
would be as long as the others was overcome in a rather charming way.
The additional month had no name, so each of its days was called in
numerical order after one of the twelve regular phases of the moon. Within the
leap‑
year this gave something like a miniature image of two and a half normal
years. In addition each unit of time had to be given its particular
significance.
The Coligny calendar's thirty‑day months were characterized as favorable,
whereas in the twenty‑nine‑day ones men were advised to walk cautiously.
Moreover, particular days in the good months were less good, and not all the
bad
days in the bad
In 1897 at Coligny in Burgundy fragments of a bronze tablet of the last
century BC came to light. Put together they constituted what is still the
longest
known document in the Gallic language. It contains forty different words
written in Latin script—for philologists, a magnificent find—and was a
calendar. In deciphering it, it became clear that the Celts worked in units of
sixty‑
two lunar months, i.e. the period between each new moon and the next. One of
these months would contain thirty days, the next twenty‑nine, which gave
half‑
months of fifteen days, or one fifteen‑day one followed by a fourteen‑day
one. Each day was counted, as is today still the practice among the Jews and
Moslems, from moon‑rise to moon‑rise, with the result that it was not
always
exactly divided into twenty‑four hours. The year that emerged from all this
was eleven days shorter than the 365‑day period the earth takes to go round
the sun.
This created a problem common to all calendar‑makers who base their
calculations on the moon. If they ignored this annual time difference, sooner
or
later March would occur when the leaves were already turning brown and June
would
be in winter. To compensate, they would have to do some juggling. Stone Age
man set up the giant constructions of Stonehenge and Carnac so as to get at
the astronomical facts necessary for solar and lunar time to be synchronized.
For a short time in the fifth century BC the Greeks, who also calculated
according to the phases of the moon, established a complicated system of
dividing
up time. The geologist Meton of Athens had worked it out. It was based on a
nine‑year cycle of twelve ordinary and seven leap‑years: the average of 110
twenty‑nine‑day and 125 thirty‑day months resulted in a mean solar year.
The
Coligny calendar was rather simpler, but arrived at by a similarly ingenious
method. The twelve‑month periods were balanced out by two of thirteen months.
In the end the period of five solar orbits emerged, fairly exactly
calculated. The disadvantage that not every year within such a
sixty‑two‑month cycle
would be as long as the others was overcome in a rather charming way.
The additional month had no name, so each of its days was called in
numerical order after one of the twelve regular phases of the moon. Within the
leap‑
year this gave something like a miniature image of two and a half normal
years. In addition each unit of time had to be given its particular
significance.
The Coligny calendar's thirty‑day months were characterized as favorable,
whereas in the twenty‑nine‑day ones men were advised to walk cautiously.
Moreover, particular days in the good months were less good, and not all the
bad
days in the bad
In 1897 at Coligny in Burgundy fragments of a bronze tablet of the last
century BC came to light. Put together they constituted what is still the
longest
known document in the Gallic language. It contains forty different words
written in Latin script—for philologists, a magnificent find—and was a
calendar. In deciphering it, it became clear that the Celts worked in units of
sixty‑
two lunar months, i.e. the period between each new moon and the next. One of
these months would contain thirty days, the next twenty‑nine, which gave
half‑
months of fifteen days, or one fifteen‑day one followed by a fourteen‑day
one. Each day was counted, as is today still the practice among the Jews and
Moslems, from moon‑rise to moon‑rise, with the result that it was not
always
exactly divided into twenty‑four hours. The year that emerged from all this
was eleven days shorter than the 365‑day period the earth takes to go round
the sun.
This created a problem common to all calendar‑makers who base their
calculations on the moon. If they ignored this annual time difference, sooner
or
later March would occur when the leaves were already turning brown and June
would
be in winter. To compensate, they would have to do some juggling. Stone Age
man set up the giant constructions of Stonehenge and Carnac so as to get at
the astronomical facts necessary for solar and lunar time to be synchronized.
For a short time in the fifth century BC the Greeks, who also calculated
according to the phases of the moon, established a complicated system of
dividing
up time. The geologist Meton of Athens had worked it out. It was based on a
nine‑year cycle of twelve ordinary and seven leap‑years: the average of 110
twenty‑nine‑day and 125 thirty‑day months resulted in a mean solar year.
The
Coligny calendar was rather simpler, but arrived at by a similarly ingenious
method. The twelve‑month periods were balanced out by two of thirteen months.
In the end the period of five solar orbits emerged, fairly exactly
calculated. The disadvantage that not every year within such a
sixty‑two‑month cycle
would be as long as the others was overcome in a rather charming way.
The additional month had no name, so each of its days was called in
numerical order after one of the twelve regular phases of the moon. Within the
leap‑
year this gave something like a miniature image of two and a half normal
years. In addition each unit of time had to be given its particular
significance.
The Coligny calendar's thirty‑day months were characterized as favorable,
whereas in the twenty‑nine‑day ones men were advised to walk cautiously.
Moreover, particular days in the good months were less good, and not all the
bad
days in the bad

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